Emacs Advent Calendar 18: Line Breaking

Fri 2015-12-18

When a (logical) line is wider than an Emacs window it is wrapped around into the next (screen) line. There are alternatives to this behavior.

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Emacs Advent Calendar 17: Compilation

Thu 2015-12-17

Emacs includes commands for compiling software and, if unsuccessful, quickly finding the locations in the source where it failed.

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Emacs Advent Calendar 16: Rectangles

Wed 2015-12-16

Another unique feature of Emacs is the ability to select rectangular parts of a buffer.

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Emacs Advent Calendar 15: File Management with Dired

Tue 2015-12-15

Emacs includes dired, a mode with file manager functionality. As this is quite a big topic, today's entry can only be considered an introduction. Read the Reference Manual for the full documentation.

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Emacs Advent Calendar 14: Shell Interaction

Mon 2015-12-14

While Emacs is an operating system on its own, sometimes it is necessary to interact with the outside world. For this purpose you can run single shell commands from Emacs or start an interactive shell session.

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Emacs Advent Calendar 13: Mouse Commands

Sun 2015-12-13

Although all Emacs functionality can be accessed using only the keyboard, the graphical version also features mouse commands.

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Emacs Advent Calendar 12: Spell checking

Sat 2015-12-12

In addition to providing commands for fixing typos, Emacs can also do spell checking on buffer contents.

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Emacs Advent Calendar 11: Replacing

Fri 2015-12-11

Emacs has two modes for searching and replacement. The first one unconditionally replaces all occurences of a searched string, the second one interactively asks what to do for every match.

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Emacs Advent Calendar 10: Searching

Thu 2015-12-10

Emacs of course has commands to search for occurences of strings.

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Emacs Advent Calendar 09: Windows

Wed 2015-12-09

At first there is some Emacs specific terminology to clear up: What today in modern GUIs is called a "window" is a "frame" in Emacs. Those frames won't be the topic for today, but the things that Emacs calls "windows": Frames can be split into several windows, displaying exactly one buffer each.

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